Got Galaxy S5 with Android KitKat 4.4

devices

I know the photo is terrible, but I wanted to capture the screen size. It is large enough to view any responsive websites without trouble while still fitting in my pocket.

Did it. I have been an iPhone user for a while, but switched to Android. Got myself an Galaxy S5, and like it alot. I noticed that there are bunch of apps out there, perhaps more choices, but quality seems to vary a bit. Looks like you need to be more selective what you choose to use. So far, the transitions were very smooth. I was using Google for most of my stuff — like gmail, contact, google calendar etc — anyway, so that was very simple. And Dropbox integration was great. It is definitely more like computer than phone, and I like it. Samsung Health app have replaced my (lost) fitbit and Sleep as Android app seems fine replacement for SleepCycle. Al the other apps that I was using on iPhone, like MLB At Bat, Waze, FoodSpotting, Wunderlist, Social Media apps (facebook, Twitter, Linkedin, Foursquare, Instagram), Evernote, OpenTable, Fantasy Baseball apps (Yahoo, CBS and ESPN) all have native android native versions. Google Play Books are as good as iBooks, and iCloud/Find iPhone capability can be (seems to be, anyway) found on Android Device Manager.

Couple of memos:

  • Lost my “Alternative Password” once already. To reset it, you just deregister all if your finger prints, and when you strat the process over, it will ask you to set alternative password.
  • I was recommended to check out Google Now, Keep, & Newsstand. All services that I was not familier with, but it looks interesting. Especially Keep.
  • Chromecast and its $35 price tag is really enticing.
  • A Tech friend, and Google guy, recommended following utility stuffs for me: Advanced Task Killer is good for keeping on top of background processes, ES File Explorer is a good general purpose file manager.
  • I am looking for pod catcher. He recommended AntennaPod, but it looks a bit too basic… Trying out Pocket Casts, (not free) but liking it so far.
  • MBTA Bus stuff, I was using Catch the Bus on iPhone, just because it was one of the first one out and did its job but since there are bunch of free ones now I am trying out YourBus MBTA. It is pretty good and seems accurate.

I’ve been posting links that I liked at Posterous (RIP) and then my tumblr blog. Here are the week worth of links:


Random front end tips and tricks

I am learning tons this week. Very exciting. Working with smart people of Bocoup, learning/picking up tricks and tips on how to do many little “a-ha, that’s how you do it” things.

Here is my notes:

  • With Editor Config, you can create a project specific configfiles for your text editor of your choice. I am using sublime, and there is a package for that. Now we have a file on the project home that specify that we use tab for indentation for our project — that’s our style that we agreed on, and we are keeping it consistent — but I can start using two spaces for my other projects with this.
  • Bower is powerful. It’s managed by Twitter. Their stock is now at $40. Time to buy?
  • This gist by Matt Surabian is awesome. If you put it in your .bash_profile, your terminal shows your branch and with a * star if there is a change that needs commits. I use terminal with white backgroudn so I change like 38 to

    echo " on "$PURPLE$branch$dirty

    If you don’t want new line, get rid of \n from line 41.

  • I am learning about require js and Asynchronous Module Definition (AMD) API (Boy, do I have a lot to learn) but here are some example of diffrent types of AMD flavors by Tim Branyen and also, example of how to use it on multi page. I think I will start with Anonymous CJS style and see how it goes from here.

I’ve been posting links that I liked at Posterous (RIP) and then my tumblr blog. Here are the week worth of links:


Vagrant+Puppet is AMAZING!

vagrant-up

At my work on my team, we have five main developers. Two of us are on Mac, while the other three are on Windows. I, as a front end guy in the group, am advocating for SASS/Compass be used prominently on the redesign, like in depth use (great book btw). There is one little problem — workflow. To be able to developed locally, SCSS require pre-compiling, and it uses ruby. Mac comes with ruby, but Windows does not. Grunt could do it, but then you need node.js/npm. If I want everyone on my team to have it, I need to install all of those (ruby/sass/compass/node/npm/grunt)… that would be just way too much customization/potential places to break.

Enter Vagrant and puppet. It is just amazingly awesome. You can create a linux machine on VirtualBox – which is an open source VM. I am running latest puppet-enabled ubuntu box available from puppetlab, which is Ubuntu 13.10 (saucy Salamander).

Dealing with Vagrant really tickled my inner linux nerd-ness. Once upon a time, I was involved with running a group called BJLUG, Boston Japanese Linux Users Group — this was way back when, when you still had to pay for Apple’s CJK Language Pack to have Japanese installed on your machine, and I figured out that if you use linux, it was FREE to write email back to Japan etc. There were certainly a lot of LUGs back then. Not sure if they are around any more.

I learned how to install puppets, thanks to my colleague Kevin D. who patiently walked me through it, and was able to create box with apache and the likes.

Now we all need to download, and then just run vagrant up and vagrant provision. And your local scss changes, on your filesystem, using your favorite text editor on your OS, will be watched and css is compiled without any additional work. This is beautiful.

The Vagrant CLI documentation was useful for me, who have not used Vagrant before.

Some useful command:

  • vagrant up – Start the VM
  • vagrant provision – Provisions the VM
  • vagrant ssh – Logs into the VM with ssh
  • vagrant reload --provision – Restarts and provisions the VM
  • vagrant suspend and vagrat resume – If you don’t want fully shut the VM down
  • vagrant halt – Stops the VM
  • vagrant destroy – Deletes the VM

Actually, first time I saw use of vagrant was WordPress VIP team’s quick start. It includes all their server hosting environment. They do good work there over at VIP. And also there are ways to have local WordPress environment in vagrant such as Varying Vagrant Vagrants (VVV) environment. I am still using MAMP for my local wordpress theme/plugin development (when I have “free time”) but perhaps I should reconsider it. For new version of Daigo.org theme?
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Slashathon! My third hackathons in 10 days.

slashathon

SXSW was pretty awesome. Total geek out. I have to go though all my notes, but it was very good. Meeting Brian Holt from Reddit was definitely the highlight, and went to two hackathons, first the Hackathon For Social Good, and then Slashathon! It was pretty cool. Event was held at Capital Factory in Austin, and the place was gorgeous. We had a plane to catch, but I kept coding in the airport… final product looked like this: Groupieology. SeatGeek’s API is pretty amazing: it requires no API Key, unlimited and very eimple to use. Including the Baseball Hack Day the Saturday before, it was my third hackathon in 10 days. My buddy Kevin Davis was a good sport and attended all three with me. Pretty crazy stuff.

Have not had a chance to use it, but this service, import.io sounds really cool. I need to check it out and see if I can use it for some hacks in the future.

I’ve been posting links that I liked at Posterous (RIP) and then my tumblr blog. Here are the week worth of links:

Continue reading…


2014 Boston Baseball Hack Day was awesome

I had an awesome time last weekend at Boston Baseball Hack Day! 33 people. 8 project. More to coem later, but it was great time, met tons of very inspiring smart people. Technology and Baseball, two of my passion combined. Awesome.

baseballhackday-logo-2014

I’m going to write up about it little more later.

Following is links that I liked. Some unrelated to BBHD.
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I like to eat

I had an amazing food at Ming Tsai’s new restaurant Blue Dragon last night. I had a wonderful time with my Valentine, Jennifer (I love you).

Here is what we had.

Course 1
Local Oysters 2 ways
oyster
Tempura with Avocado Purée &
On The Half Shell with Beet Mignonette, Yuzu and Caviar

Course 2
Peking-Glazed Squab Breast
Foie Gras “Dirty” Fried Rice and Juniper Sauce

squab

Course 3
Lamb Loin Roulade with Root Vegetable Gratin
Black Truffle-Mushroom Ragout

lamb

Course 4
Double Chocolate Chip Skillet Cookie
cookie

I do eat out a lot (I have spotted 1,046 food items on my foodspotting so far), but most the time, I look for cheap food, so it may have been one of the most expensive night out. I think it was worth it — kind of food that I would expect to have if I spend a lot of money — it was like explosions of flavors. Blue Dragon may have become my favorite place to go.

We were also having this sake: Kikusui Funaguchi Ichiban Shibori, Nama genshu, Honjozo.
funaguchi-kikusui

It was pretty delicious. Kikusui home page, and rakuten shopping page.

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Beautiful slice of life from Tokyo

(Articles that I liked: Friday, January 24, 2014)

Adam Magyar, Stainless – Shinjuku from Adam Magyar on Vimeo.

Shinjuku Station is the Guinness World Records registered busiest transport hub of the world (according to Wikipedia.) I have been there and it is really amazing. This high-speed/slow-motion video Stainless – Shinjuku from Adam Magyar captures the moment that train rolls in. It is quite amazing. Beautiful. Also from this blog, you can see the presentation on the artist, how he did it.

I’ve been posting links that I liked at Posterous (RIP) and then my tumblr blog. Here are the week worth of links:

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Learning from successful people

(Articles that I liked: Friday, January 17, 2014)
Nine Things Successful People Do Differently by Heidi Grant Halvorson on HBR was quite good. The post was from 2011, but it was linked recently from some blog post that I was reading. I should look at this list time to time.

  1. Get specific
  2. Seize the moment to act on your goals
  3. Know exactly how far you have left to go
  4. Be a realistic optimist
  5. Focus on getting better, rather than being good
  6. Have grit
  7. Built your willpower muscle
  8. Don’t tempt fate
  9. Focus on what you will do, not what you won’t do

NYTimes’s redesign thoughts (Behind the Scenes on the NYT Redesign) was also quite interesting. Liked this quote by Eitan Konigsburg:

[Rebuilding of the technical foundation] includes using Github instead of SVN for version control, Vagrant environments, Puppet deployment, using requireJS so five different versions of jQuery don’t get loaded, proper build/test frameworks, command-line tools for generating sprites, the use of LESS with a huge set of mixins, a custom grid framework, etc.

We are doing a lot of the same stuff. Good stuff.

They also sounds like they had a goal all along, specified. See the number one of that top list there?

  • Be faster.
  • Have a more flexible and adaptive presentation.
  • Have consistency across platforms.
  • Make the site easier to for the newsroom to produce and maintain.
  • Make it easier for our readers to read, navigation, share and explore.
  • Maintain and convert subscribers.
  • Create a high-quality advertising environment.

I’ve been posting links that I liked at Posterous (RIP) and then my tumblr blog. Here are the two weeks worth of links:

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Leveling up in the game of life

(Articles that I liked: Friday, January 3, 2014)

dragon-quest

This is the game that I really, really, really really liked when I was kid. Dragon Quest by Enix. (English wiki page)

A Happy New Year.

Yes, it is beginning of the year and it is so typical/predictable of me, but I am trying out a new methods that I heard from a friend, nerdfitness.com, and decided to level up in my life in 2014.

So here’s what we can do in real life: identify the badasses who are higher levels than you, who already are what you want to become. Then learn from them!

I am not calling it a new years resolution, because those usually don’t last.

To be specific, I am hovering over 200 lbs now and I’d like to be under 190 lbs and keep it there. To do so, I am going back to practicing Aikido (2014 goal: Pass 3rd-Kyu Rank Test) and am leaning toward doing Paleo Diet — meaning not completely eliminating food that are not allowed (like Soft Drinks, Fruit Juices, Legumes i.e. peanuts, Grains, Fatty Meats, Salty Foods, Starchy Vegetables, Snacks, Energy Drinks, Sweets), but rather “limiting” them. For example, I am Japanese and can’t completely eliminate rice. I am going haiga rice first, and eventually maybe moving towards brown rice (yuck!). But, can I reduce the amount or donuts that I eat? Sure, I can. No soft drinks and energy drinks ever again. Sure. The diet calls for no beer/alcohol, but well, again, limiting not eliminating. I can Still eat all meats, all fish/seafood, fruits and veggies, Eggs, nuts.

And I am going to go on a vacation, either a cruise or all-inclusive trip. And am finally going to apply for my citizenship before I turn 40! Clock is ticking. I have 5 month.

I’ve been posting links that I liked at Posterous (RIP) and then my tumblr blog. Here are the week worth of links:

Continue reading…


New Reverie is out, and this blog is now Foundation 5 based.

(Articles that I liked: Friday, December 20, 2013)

foundation5

Foundation 5 rocks. It is awesome and now this blog is using it, thanks to Reverie!

New Reverie is out! I have just ran a code that I detailed before to sync the forked repo, and boom, without much work, this blog is now Foundation 5 based. Nice.

My next step is to take advantage of such neat feature as Interchange and Orbit right inside of WordPress. It is quite exciting.

I’ve been posting links that I liked at Posterous (RIP) and then my tumblr blog. Here are the week worth of links: